Posted in poetry potluck

Poetry Potluck: French Toast Amandine

Food and poetry have long been a perfect pairing. In this reblog of a section in our newsletter, we share a recipe and poem duo to feed all the senses. To submit your own pairing, e-mail cpoetry@msu.edu with the subject line “Poetry Potluck Submission” and include the recipe, poem, and a brief introduction as to why they are meaningful to you. This week’s pair is brought to you by Center for Poetry intern Kelsey Block.

 

french toast
Image via The New York Times

I found this recipe scrolling around on the New York Times’ website a few weeks ago. My friend and I have recently started having weekend brunches, and when I saw this, I immediately knew it would be perfect for the occasion. I don’t get to see her as often as I would like, so the hours we spend cooking and eating together are some of the most lighthearted moments of my week, and I really do cherish them. I think this poem does a good job of illustrating the air of companionship that often accompanies working in the kitchen.

– Kelsey

French Toast Amandine
Ingredients

  • 6 large eggs
  •  ½ cup whole milk, cream or half and half
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  •  ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 loaf thick-sliced brioche, challah or country bread
  • 1 cup sliced almonds
  • 4 to 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, ideally clarified or high-fat.

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 200. Whisk together eggs, milk (or cream or half and half), sugar, salt and vanilla extract.
  2. Lay bread in a baking pan, and pour egg mixture over top. Let sit 3 minutes, then turn slices over, making sure egg mixture has covered slices, with no dry spots
  3. Spread sliced almonds on a baking sheet, and put soaked bread slices on top. Press to adhere, then turn and repeat on other side; sprinkle with almond slices as needed. One side will be more crusted; cook that side first (and serve facing up).
  4. Put some of the butter into a skillet placed over medium-high heat; when it’s hot, add bread slices in batches, cooking until they’re golden brown and crisp, a few minutes per side. Transfer finished toasts to a platter, and place in oven to keep warm. Repeat with remaining butter and bread.
  5. Serve finished toasts with fruit compote, maple syrup or (and!) a dusting of confectioners’ sugar.

“Breakfast”
By Mary Lamb

A dinner party, coffee, tea,
Sandwich, or supper, all may be
In their way pleasant. But to me
Not one of these deserves the praise
That welcomer of new-born days,
A breakfast, merits; ever giving
Cheerful notice we are living
Another day refreshed by sleep,
When its festival we keep.
Now although I would not slight
Those kindly words we use ‘Good night’,
Yet parting words are words of sorrow,
And may not vie with sweet ‘Good Morrow’,
With which again our friends we greet,
When in the breakfast-room we meet,
At the social table round,
Listening to the lively sound
Of those notes which never tire,
Of urn, or kettle on the fire.
Sleepy Robert never hears
Or urn, or kettle; he appears
When all have finished, one by one
Dropping off, and breakfast done.
Yet has he too his own pleasure,
His breakfast hour’s his hour of leisure;
And, left alone, he reads or muses,
Or else in idle mood he uses
To sit and watch the venturous fly,
Where the sugar’s piled high,
Clambering o’er the lumps so white,
Rocky cliffs of sweet delight.
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Author:

The Center for Poetry opened in the fall of 2007 to encourage the reading, writing, and discussion of poetry and to create an awareness of the place and power of poetry in our everyday lives. We think about this in a number of ways, including through readings, shows, community outreach, and workshops. We are at work building a poetry community at MSU and in the greater Lansing area. Contact: cpoetry@msu.edu (517) 884-1932 http://www.poetry.rcah.msu.edu

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